Architecture Schmarchitecture

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz

21 March - 26 April 2003

Isa Genzken
Untitled ( New York Series) 1999/2000
set of 10 unique c- prints
60 x 40 cms / 23.6 x 15.7 cms each 

Liam Gillick
Staggered Relational Screen 2003
anodized aluminium, plexiglas
200 x 200 x 10 cm / 78.7 x 78.7 x 3.9 in

Thomas Scheibitz
Plaza 2003
gouache, vinyl pigment marker spray on canvas
186 x 249 cm / 73.2 x 98 in  

Roger Hiorns
Weakness 2003
mild steel, enamel & copper sulphate
224 x 260 x 6 cm / 88.2 x 102.4 x 2.4 in

Sarah Morris
Bathroom Floor (Blue) 1997
gloss household paint on canvas
183 x 183 cm / 72 x 72 in  

Isa Genzken
Working Title: Babies 1997
various metal parts
90 cm / 35.4 in height  

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

Jim Lambie, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Roger Hiorns, Sarah Morris & Thomas Scheibitz
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
21 March - 26 April 2003

The Kerlin Gallery is pleased to announce Architecture Schmarchitecture, a group show of six internationally renowned artists whose work is among the most engaging and influential of recent years.

 

In various disparate ways architecture provides a point of departure or of intersection, a space for discussion or play for each of the artists in this exhibition.

 

The paintings of Sarah Morris may be read as gorgeously gleaming simulations of the coldly seductive facades that line the high-rise canyons of the contemporary metropolis. As such they both complement and contrast with her series of sharply-edited short films charting the constant blur of human movement through the 'non-places' of supermodernity.

 

The irreverent beauty and makeshift exuberance of Isa Genzken's sculptures come from somewhere quite other. Flawed and wistful models for living in a more colourful world, they exude an air of simultaneous world-weariness and irrepressibility.

 

Jim Lambie's art is similarly beholden to a poetics of glittering dilapidation, whether his psychedelic formalism takes the form of disorientingly striped vinyl floors or the dazzling sculptural concatenations of beat-up mirrors and customised music paraphernalia.

 

The brimming image-bank from which Thomas Scheibitz draws the motifs which morph and fuse together in his paintings and sculptures is particularly rich in relation to the humbler varieties of vernacular building.

 

If Roger Hiorn's crystal-encrusted model kits, gleefully purposeless mechanical contraptions, and inventive, geometric drawings in space have anything in common it is a feeling of compromised domesticity, a sense of being slightly adrift, not quite at home in the world in which they find themselves.

 

Liam Gillick's response to a potentially inhospitable environment might range from a subtle intervention to a comprehensive makeover. A tireless multi-tasker and thought-provoking yarn-spinner, his cool and canny negotiations between design and discursivity have taken numerous forms over the past decade, including, and with increasing frequency, the architectural.